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Bindon Aiming Concept

“BOTH EYES OPEN” SHOOTING

Human vision is based upon a binocular (two eyes) presentation of visual evidence to the brain. (The word “binocular” literally means using both eyes at the same time.) This means, that when utilizing an optic in the 1980s, before reticle illumination, the shooter was forced to close one eye to acquire a target.

Glyn Bindon, founder of Trijicon®, knew that every optic on the market could vary its zero between two shooters (more importantly, between two soldiers) because no two shooters’ eyes were the same. However, Glyn wondered if an illuminated reticle (as opposed to traditional black crosshairs) would help the user acquire a target with both eyes open while keeping the reticle in the sight picture the entire time.

THE DISCOVERY OF THE BINDON AIMING CONCEPT (BAC)

Glyn discovered that with both eyes open, if there is a bright enough light in the reticle field when the weapon is being moved, the primary eye will see the illuminated reticle inside the sight, while the other eye sees the target and the background. These are two separate images, but the brain receives the signal from both eyes and automatically merges the images then automatically selects the magnified image received by the primary eye.

HOW TO FIND YOUR DOMINANT EYE

To maximize the potential of “both eyes open” aiming, you must know which eye is dominant. To determine this, conduct the following test: 

  1. OPEN BOTH EYES, and hold your index finger out in front of your line of sight on a fixed object. 
  2. Next, CLOSE your non-shooting eye and note the position of finger on target. 
  3. Then OPEN BOTH eyes, keeping finger on target. 
  4. Finally, CLOSE opposite eye and note position of finger on target.

 If your finger/aiming point does NOT move, that is your dominant eye. If your finger/aiming point moves off target at a great distance, your OTHER eye is dominant.
 

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